Blood Orange Marmalade

I saw a post from @mainelyhomelife asking “how do you choose what to share next on instagram?”.

This made me think about my post about how I use to struggle with posting, and now I happily commented, “I used to plan my posts, but now it depends on how I’m feeling and how I’m connecting with my image”.

Feeling Inspired

This capture was done last winter, when blood oranges were in season.

I absolutely love blood oranges and adore the analogous colours it throws at you ❤️🧡💛.

And what do you do when you’re in lockdown during winters blood orange season, make blood orange marmalade of course, and I’m so glad I did it.

The marmalade carries a very delicate zest, with a lovely floral taste to it, and when you get a bite with the strips of rind, it’s like a flavour bomb of sweet citrus. Yum!

Delicious loaded on sourdough, stirred in with your favourite curries or heated and drizzled like syrup over waffles or pancakes 🤤🤤🤤.

So why am I sharing this now?

Well I’ve been seeing a lot of beautiful blood orange images lately here, thanks to #bloodorangeseason2021 and #useyourcreativenoodle, and it just made me think of that wonderful time I made these blood orange jam, and how much I enjoyed capturing that process, so here it is ❤️.

My inspiration and connection to todays post 🙏🏻.

Recipe to this deliciously versatile marmalade can be found below.

Di x

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Blood Orange Marmalade

Course Jam
Cuisine Traditional
Keyword Jam
Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 1 hour
Resting Time 8 hours
Servings 4 200 ml jars
Calories 785 kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 blood oranges Skin finely grated
  • 1 lemon
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 4 cups water

Instructions

  1. Finely grate the blood orange peel into julienne with a mandolin

    * If you don't have a mandolin, simply peel the skin and cut skin finely.

    Note: the thicker the rind the more citrus flavour it will hold.

  2. Soak rinds in a bowl with 2 cups of water and leave overnight to infuse.

    Note: This will help the skin release all those beautiful citrus oil.

  3. Now this is the hard part…

    Remove the peel of both the blood oranges and lemons, and begin to remove the clear skin, only retaining the juicy flesh as well as the seeds of the blood oranges.

    These are the pectins, what helps your marmalade set.

    Note: Be sure to try and not get too much of the white membrane as this will make your marmalade bitter.

  4. Once complete, cover and store in the fridge till ready to use.

Next Day

  1. Place all the pulp and pectins into a muslin or cheese cloth and tie tightly.

  2. In a large pot, add the water with the soaked rind, another 2 cups of water, sugar and the muslin pulp and bring to boil.

  3. Once boiled, remove the muslin pulp, sqeezing as much liquid out as you can and let the marmalade continue to cook until liquid temperature reaches 110°C or 230°F.

    Note: If you do not have a candy thermometer, alternatively you can put a small amount marmalade on a plates that's been in the freezer. 

    Run your fingers through the marmalade and if the marmalade stays separated, then it's ready.

  4. Be sure to stir the marmalade continously to stop it from burning and boiling over.

  5. Carefully pour in sterilised jar and let it cool completely before tightening the lids.

Recipe Notes

Preparation time may differ, depending on how long you take to remove the blood orange flesh from the skin.

 

If you don’t have a mandolin, simply peel the skin and cut skin finely.

 

The thicker the rind the more citrus flavour it will hold.

 

Soaking the rind in water overnight will help the skin release all those beautiful citrus oil.

 

Be sure to try and not get too much of the white membrane as this will make your marmalade bitter.

 

If you do not have a candy thermometer, alternatively you can put a small amount marmalade on a plates that’s been in the freezer.

 

Run your fingers through the marmalade and if the marmalade stays separated, then it’s ready.

 

Be sure to stir the marmalade continuously to stop it from burning and boiling over.

 

I strongly recommend using a pot double the size of the liquid, as marmalade will start to boil and splatter when reaching it’s needed temperature.

 

Marmalade will keep for 1 to 2 years if unopened.

Store in refrigerator once opened.

 

*Nutrition information is approximate and is meant as a guide only

 

Nutrition Facts
Blood Orange Marmalade
Amount Per Serving
Calories 785 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 14mg1%
Potassium 53mg2%
Carbohydrates 203g68%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 201g223%
Protein 1g2%
Calcium 19mg2%
Vitamin C 18mg22%
Vitamin A 21IU0%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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